Purgatory

“Human nature has graced us with so many great things, we tend to remember and glorify the good of our souls. Frequently we dismiss or forget the true face of humanity that continuously reemerges throughout history across the world. Peace and empathy are as much part of our reality as is war and hatred. Too often we dismiss the horrific and don’t take responsibility for it. By accepting war as normal we have become participants. The project aims to put the viewer before a user generated cinematic experience that brings forward this contradiction.

The project is an interactive performance audiovisual installation. It primarily uses the Emotive Epoc+ as a means to read the viewer’s sub conscious and semiconscious mind-states such as frustration, anxiety and excitement. These mind-states are linked to software and are used to generate a unique cinematic experience for each viewer. While frustration might bring forward more horrific images, a more relaxed and a meditative state of mind would be reflected in showing more peaceful scenes.

The project aims to bring the viewer an aesthetic experience, while at the same time remind him of the horrors we as humans are still capable of.”

A collaborative work with artist Jernej Čuček Gerbec (Slovenia), Purgatory is an interactive performance installation. Dealing within the Binary of War and Peace, the installation uses the participant’s state of mind to sequence and juxtapose a series of videos in ever-changing permutations, thereby creating a non-looping, unending, unique cinematic experience everytime it is accessed. This is done by tapping into the User/participant’s mind-state by using a wireless EEG (Emotiv Epoc+) machine that enables us to access emotional states such as frustration, anxiety, excitement etc. and using this data as parameters that control the flow and juxtapositions of video sequences. These videos range from archival war footage, film clips, documentary footage, advertisements, news clips, landscape panoramas and home videos. The intensity of footage change, intensity of violence depicted, type of violence, as well as speed, fluctuations and glitch are all affected by the brainwaves of the user, who views the ‘livestream’ through VR (Virtual Reality) headsets, while a projection plays out this performance to other viewers.

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